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FAQ

Where is the Reform Party on the political spectrum?

The Reform Party is a moderate, centrist and populist party that sits in the center of the political spectrum. It has moderate fiscal and economic platforms mixed with strong calls for ethics and electoral reform based on populist beliefs.

What are the goals of the Reform Party?

The Reform Party seeks to be a viable alternative to the Democratic and Republican Parties. It exists to nominate and support members running for office, and promote legislation its members believe benefit the United States.

How does the Reform Party differ from the Republicans and Democrats?

The Democrats represent the twenty percent of voters on the left end of the political spectrum, and the Republicans represent the twenty percent on the right. The Reform Party fights for the sixty percent of voters in the middle that currently have no representation.

How does the Reform Party differ from other minor parties?

Generally speaking most minor parties are fringe groups that support radical platforms. The Reform Party is a mainstream organization that supports moderate ideals.

Why does the Reform Party take no stances on social issues?

The Reform Party believes that social issues or values issues (which include issues such as abortion, gay marriage, and end of life decisions) should not be our focus as a party.  Instead our focus should be on issues such as the economy, government fiscal accountability, trade, national security, and jobs.

Is the Reform Party a cult of personality based around Ross Perot?

It is true that the Reform Party was founded by Ross Perot supporters, and its platform is built on many principles he ran on in 1992 and 1996. Ross Perot however has not been active in the party in over a decade, and the party runs without any support from him. The Reform Party has nominated people that did not support Perot and the party’s platform does not mirror Perot’s political beliefs.

How was the Reform Party Funded?

The Reform Party is primarily funded by individual members and supporters that make small donations. Ninety percent of the donations we receive are one hundred dollars or less. Of course we do receive some large cash and in-kind donations, but the small donors are the party’s financial base.

The Reform Party takes no money from political action committees or any other special interest groups.

Do any individuals profit from Reform Party activities?

No. The Reform Party is staffed by volunteers and has no paid employees. One hundred percent of all donations go towards party activities.

What are the future plans of the Reform Party?

The Reform Party plans to continue building infrastructure necessary for fundraising, marketing and public relations. It is also plans to reorganize and improve state affiliates until it has ballot lines in all fifty states and the District of Columbia – plus active parties in all American territories. It will run candidates in elections in federal, state and local elections.

Can a minor party candidate really get elected?

Yes!  The Reform Party had a state governor who left office with a 70% approval rate. Independent and minor party candidates have been elected to local, state, and federal offices throughout our nation’s history. The only offices that have not been held by a minor party or independent candidate in the last century are the offices of the president and vice president.

Is it true that voting for a minor party is just wasting a vote?

The only vote wasted is the one not cast, or the one cast for who you believe will win instead of who you want. Voting for the lesser of two bad candidates only brings more of the same. Minor party candidates hold over two hundred offices nationwide. Some of those are held by Reform Party members. The highest office achieved by a Reform Party candidate in the last twenty years was governor of the state of Minnesota. Minor parties can and do win – all it takes is voting for the best candidate.